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 Courses - College Program

Humanities
History and Criticism of Art, Film and Theatre
English
Literature
Writing
Modern Foreign Languages
Philosophy
Social Sciences
Mathematics and Science

All courses listed may not be offered each year. Lists of courses available in any given year may be obtained from the Undergraduate Academic office.

GES 101, 102, 103: Critical Perspectives (2 Credits per Term) (See Courses - College Program)

GES 211, 212, 213: Foundations of Western Thought (2 Credits per Term) (See Courses - College Program)

Humanities

Humanities (HUM) 121, 122, 123: The Arts in Context (2 Credits per Term)
An examination of major historical periods in the Western world and the artistic styles which characterize them, with particular attention to visual arts, music, literature, and drama.

HUM 121: The Ancient and Early Christian Worlds

HUM 122: The Medieval and Renaissance Worlds

HUM 123: The Modern World

Humanities (HUM) 290: Topics in the Humanities (2 Credits)
One-term intensive studies in which the instructor and students are challenged to examine some facet of the Western humanistic tradition. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

History and Criticism of Art, Film and Theatre

Art History (ARH) 101, 102, 103 (2 Credits per Term)
A three-term historical survey of the major styles in painting, sculpture, and architecture in Western civilization; non-Western styles as time allows.

ARH 101: Ancient and Christian

ARH 102: Medieval through Renaissance

ARH 103: Baroque to Modern

Theatre History (THH) 241: Dramatic Theory and Criticism (2 Credits)
This course is designed to explore significant contributions to dramatic theory and criticism from the Greeks to the present. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, or equivalent.

Theatre History (THH) 242: Design and Performance (2 Credits)
This course is designed to move from the Greeks to the present by focusing on significant contributions to design and performance theory and technique. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, or equivalent.

Theatre History (THH) 243: Performance Forms (2 Credits)
This course is designed to explore various non-literary performance forms from the ancient to the contemporary. It will include not only European forms, but also present theatrical developments in China, Japan, Africa and Indonesia. Prerequisite: GES 101,102, or equivalent.

English

English (ESL) 100: Academic English for Non-Native Speakers (No Credit)
Offered only to non-native speakers of English, this course concentrates on improving academic skills. Particular emphasis is given to practicing college-level reading and writing.

English (ENG) 100: Learning and Academic Skills Laboratory (No Credit)
A course designed to assist students in improving learning skills through application of the basic principles of learning, and in overcoming deficiencies in analysis, reading and writing.

Literature

The single-term elective literature courses extend the critical thinking, reading and writing skills developed in the prerequisite Critical Perspectives courses (GES 101, 102, 103). The literature courses also extend students’ familiarity with the topics, themes and ideas that emerge from the required Foundations of Western Thought courses (GES 211, 212, 213). Literature courses are offered to enhance areas of the programs of the five arts schools, to respond to student interest in timely material and to take advantage of faculty research and expertise. Individual courses are repeated on average no more often than every three years so that students have access to a fresh variety of course offerings each term they are enrolled. The literature courses are designated by one of the following course titles:

Literature (LIT) 104: Introduction to World Literature (2 Credits)
A study of literature from a variety of world traditions. Topics alternate between Introduction to World Literary Traditions and Introduction to World Folktales. The course focuses on the development of skills in text analysis, writing and discussion. Offered to first-year students who have completed GES 101.

Literature (LIT) 220: Literature in English (2 Credits)
The study of a variety of texts from American, British and other literatures written in English. Each course focuses on the work of a writer, group of writers, region, period, style, genre or theme. Representative titles from courses offered in recent years: Romantic Art, Romantic Lives; Contemporary Popular Fiction; Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales”; Recent American Poetry; Women Writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Literature (LIT) 230: Literature in Translation (2 Credits)
The study of a variety of texts from world literature translated into English. Each course focuses on the work of a writer, group of writers, region, period, style, genre or theme. Representative titles from courses offered in recent years: Women In the Ancient World; Italo Calvino, Storyteller; French and German Fairy Tales; Classical Lyric Poetry. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Literature (LIT) 240: Comparative Literature (2 Credits)
The study of a variety of texts from world literature translated into English. Course topics are selected for correspondence of themes, subjects, forms, styles or critical issues regardless of boundaries of nation or language. Representative titles from courses offered in recent years: Narratives of Madness; Don Juan; Fantasy Literature. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Literature (LIT) 290: Topics in Dramatic Literature (2 Credits)
A series of courses that focus on the work of individual playwrights or groups of playwrights, or on dramatic works representing various periods, nations, styles or themes. Representative titles from courses offered in recent years: Ibsen & Shaw; Epic Theatre; Theatre of the Absurd; Tragedy in Athens; The Blood Tragedies, Shakespeare & the Other; Postmodern Drama. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Writing

The single-term elective writing courses provide opportunities for students who write correctly and fluently to extend their skills at creative or professional writing in directions of particular interest. Literary and journalistic texts may be assigned, primarily as models for writing. The work of these courses is accomplished by frequent critiqued and graded assignments, presented in class. A high value is placed on student participation and peer discussion of in-progress and completed assignments. Instruction is given in appropriate and effective techniques for peer critique and for revision. The writing courses are designated by one of the following course titles:

WRI 150: Introduction to Creative Writing (2 Credits per Term)
A first course in creative writing or personal narrative. The course focuses on the development of skills for effective use and understanding of language choices in writing. Topics alternate between “Introductory Creative Writing” and “Personal Narrative: Letters, Journals, Memoirs.” Offered to first-year students who have completed GES 101. Prerequisite: Completion of GES 101.

WRI 250: Topics in Practical and Professional Writing (2 Credits per Term)
Representative course topics: Arts Reviewing and Criticism, The Art of the Interview. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or the equivalent.

WRI 260: Topics in Creative Writing (2 Credits per Term)
Representative course topics: Fiction Writing, Poetry Writing, Dramatic Writing, Writing Adaptations, Writing for Solo Performance. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or the equivalent.

WRI 360: Advanced Topics in Writing (2 Credits per Term)
Greater student initiative and independence is expected than for WRI 250 and 260. Representative course topics: Fiction, Poetry or Dramatic Writing. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 plus WRI 250 or 260 and permission of instructor.

Modern Foreign Languages

French (FRE) 101, 102, 103: Elementary French (2 Credits per Term)
An introduction to the French language with the goal of oral proficiency. The major emphasis is on spoken French, basic grammar and vocabulary building, which will provide the student with necessary language skills to function on a basic level in a French-speaking country. The student will also learn about cultural elements of the country and its people. Prerequisite for FRE 102: FRE 101 or permission of instructor. Prerequisite for FRE 103: FRE 102 or permission of instructor.

French (FRE) 201, 202, 203: Intermediate French (3 Credits per Term)
Continuation of structural skills and vocabulary as needed for expanded understanding and production of the French language. Reading of contemporary literature, which will help familiarize the student not only with the everyday language, but also with current issues and the way French people feel, think, and act. Prerequisite: FRE 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Advanced-level tutorials are available in French conversation, literature or culture, tailored to the interests of the individual student. By permission of the instructor.

German (GER) 101, 102, 103: Elementary German (2 Credits per Term)
An introduction to the German language with the goal of oral proficiency. The major emphasis is on spoken German, basic grammar and vocabulary building, which will provide the student with necessary language skills to function on a basic level in a German-speaking country. The student will also learn about cultural elements of the country and its people. Prerequisite for GER 102: GER 101 or permission of instructor. Prerequisite for GER 103: GER 102 or permission of instructor.

German (GER) 201, 202, 203: Intermediate German (3 Credits per Term)
Continuation of structural skills and vocabulary as needed for expanded understanding and production of the German language. Reading of contemporary literature, which helps familiarize the student not only with the everyday language, but also with current issues and the way German people feel, think and act. Prerequisite: GER 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Advanced-level tutorials are available in German conversation, literature or culture, tailored to the interests of the individual student. By permission of the instructor.

Italian (ITA) 101, 102, 103: Elementary Italian (2 Credits per Term)
An introduction to Italian, with the goal of oral proficiency. Attention is given to pronunciation, conversation skills, basic grammar, and the culture from which the language derives. Prerequisite for ITA 102: ITA 101 or permission of instructor. Prerequisite for ITA 103: ITA 102 or permission of instructor.

Italian (ITA) 201, 202, 203: Intermediate Italian (3 Credits per Term)
Continuation of introduction of all essential Italian grammar. Increased conversational fluency through practice of structures and vocabulary, with additional literary and cultural materials. Prerequisite: ITA 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Advanced-level tutorials are available in Italian conversation, literature or culture, tailored to the interests of the individual student. By permission of the instructor.

Philosophy

The single-term elective philosophy courses utilize the reading, writing, and analytic skills developed in the Critical Perspectives courses (GES 101, 102, 103) to begin further exploration of ideas examined in the Foundations of Western Thought courses (GES 211, 212, 213) or to investigate alternative intellectual options. The electives presented during any given year are taken from either the history of philosophy or topics in philosophy offerings.

Philosophy (PHI) 101: Introduction to Philosophy (2 credits)
An introduction to some central philosophical debates about the nature of the self, the constitution of the ultimate reality, and the foundation of value.

Philosophy (PHI) 211: Readings in Ancient Philosophy (2 Credits)
An examination of the birth of philosophical thought in the West, culminating in the work of Plato and Aristotle. Attention is given to non-Western thinkers and traditions. Prerequisite: GES 101 or permission of instructor.

Philosophy (PHI) 212: Readings in Medieval Philosophy (2 Credits)
Investigations of some of the major philosophical traditions of the Middle Ages, with some attention given to the cultural and social context of the philosophers to be studied. Prerequisite: GES 101 or permission of instructor.

Philosophy (PHI) 213: Readings in Modern Philosophy (2 Credits)
A study of some of the representative thinkers in the period from Descartes to the present. Prerequisite: GES 101 or permission of instructor.

Philosophy (PHI) 214: Readings in Contemporary Philosophy (2 Credits)
A study of contemporary thinkers representative of current important trends in philosophical thought. Prerequisite: GES 101 or permission of instructor.

Philosophy (PHI) 224: Metaphysics and Mysticism (2 Credits)
Various perspectives on what is ultimately real and how it can be known. Readings and authors studied will vary but usually include Plato, Descartes, Berkeley, and representatives of Daoism, among others. Prerequisite: GES 101 or permission of instructor.

Philosophy (PHI) 225: Moral and Political Philosophy (2 Credits)
What is a good life and a good society? What is right and wrong? Why be moral? These and similar questions provide the points of departure for this course. Prerequisite: GES 101 or permission of instructor.

Philosophy (PHI) 226: Philosophy of Religion (2 Credits)
An examination of Western and non-Western religious ideas, with a large segment of the course given to problems concerning the nature of religious knowledge, the nature and existence of God, and the problem of evil. Prerequisite: GES 101 or permission of instructor.

Philosophy (PHI) 227: Philosophy of Art (2 Credits)
An examination of classical and contemporary theories of the nature of art and artistry. Prerequisite: GES 211 and 212.

Philosophy (PHI) 290: Special Topics in Philosophy (2 Credits)
In-depth examinations of particular thinkers, movements, or philosophical problems. Prerequisite: GES 101 or permission of instructor.

Social Sciences

Social Science (SOS) 124, 125, 226: American Cultural Studies (2 Credits per Term) (Offered as needed.)

Social Science (SOS) 124: A survey of American culture and society from 1776 through the Civil War era, with emphasis on the development of distinctively American ideas, institutions and art.

Social Science (SOS) 125: A topical survey of American culture from 1880 to the present, with emphasis on what happens to American ideas, institutions and arts as the United States becomes an industrial and urban world power.

Social Science (SOS) 226: Specialized topics focusing on one facet of American culture.
A different topic is chosen each term. Examples have included The American Political Tradition, The American South, Democracy in America. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Social Science (SOS) 154: Archaeology and Human Evolution (2 Credits)
A survey of the origins of ourselves and our cultures since human beings appeared on Earth. The biological and environmental forces that influenced the ways our ancestors lived are reviewed. Methods by which this information has been learned and likely directions for our future as a species will be considered.

Social Science (SOS) 155: Cultural Anthropology (2 Credits)
A consideration of the interrelated parts of cultures, reasons for their creation, and why and how they change. The course also examines the functions of a culture’s major symbolic systems, with special attention to the arts.

Social Science (SOS) 156: World Cultures (2 Credits)
An exploration of human cultures in one of the following regions: Africa, Asia, North or South America, Europe, or the Pacific to reveal common and unique features in lifestyles from each region. The cultures are placed in an ecological and evolutionary framework. Regional focus rotates; subjects vary each term and year. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103; SOS 155 recommended.

Social Science (SOS) 236: European Cultural Studies (2 Credits per Term) (Offered as needed.)
Special topics (a focus on one facet of European culture; a different topic is chosen each year). Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Social Science (SOS) 244, 245, 246: Contemporary World Issues (2 Credits per Term) (Offered as needed.)
An examination of contemporary issues of global, national and individual importance.

Social Science (SOS) 244: Global Perspectives (2 Credits)
An examination of major contemporary and world problems including population and food supply, war, the impact of technology, and the role of modern science. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Social Science (SOS) 245: The Western World in the Contemporary Age (2 Credits)
An examination of the major national and international problems of the Western industrial nations, with emphasis on domestic political issues, economic trends and social issues. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Social Science (SOS) 246: The Non-Western World in the Contemporary Age (2 Credits)
An examination of non-Western cultures, governments and values, with special attention to problems of the Third-World countries. The course will include a broad treatment of non-Western cultures as well as a special focus each year on a single non-Western culture. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

Social Science (SOS) 290: Contemporary Issues in Anthropology (2 Credits)
A special topics course in which specific material may be changed according to class interest, but which will deal with an area of concern in anthropology and the other social sciences today. Prerequisite: GES 101, 102, 103 or equivalent.

 

Mathematics and Science

student wishing to fulfill the all-school science/mathematics requirement may choose from the following options:

  • Satisfactory completion of at least one 200-level mathematics course
  • Satisfactory completion of at least one science course

Note: MATHEMATICS (MAT) 100 may be used to make up mathematics deficiencies. Determined by the UNC Minimum Course Requirements (MCRs).

Mathematics (MAT) 100: Foundations of Mathematics: Algebra (No Credit)
A study of the properties of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, graphing, polynomials and quadratic equations.

Mathematics (MAT) 100: Foundations of Mathematics: Geometry (No Credit)
A study of parallel lines and transversals, quadrilaterals, regular polygons, similarity, ratio and proportion, right triangle theorems, distance, mid-point formulas, circles, area and volume, prisms, cones, proof exercises. Prerequisite: MAT 100: Foundations of Mathematics: Algebra or equivalent.

Mathematics (MAT) 100: Foundations of Mathematics: Trigonometry (No Credit)
A study of right-triangle trigonometry, trigonometric ratios and applications, the Unit Circle, fundamental identities, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines and application. Prerequisite: MAT 100: Foundations of Mathematics: Geometry or equivalent.

MAT 101: Foundations of Mathematics: Trigonometry (2 credits)
A study of right-triangle trigonometry, trigonometric ratios and applications, the Unit Circle, fundamental identities, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines and applications. Prerequisite: Mat 100: Foundation of Geometry or equivalent.

Mathematics (MAT) 201: College Algebra (2 Credits)
A study of real and complex numbers, linear, quadratic, absolute value equations and inequalities, functions and their graphs. Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II.

Mathematics (MAT) 202: College Trigonometry (2 Credits)
A study of the six trigonometric functions; the Unit Circle; radians and degrees; graphing trigonometric functions; data analysis using the TI-82 calculator; scatter plots; curve-fitting; solving right triangles; oblique triangles; applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201 or equivalent.

Mathematics (MAT) 203: Fundamentals of Calculus (2 Credits)
An introduction to calculus for students who have completed College Algebra and Trigonometry. Among the topics studied are limits, the derivative, applications, extrema, antiderivatives, area and the definite integral. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201 and 202 or permission of instructor.

Science (SCI) 102: Light and Sound (2 Credits)
A study of the wave characteristics of light and sound with emphasis on the application of concepts to music, lighting, and color. Attention will be paid to the processes of seeing and hearing.

Science (SCI) 134: Geology of the American Landscape (2 Credits)
A study of the surface processes (rivers, glaciers, groundwater, winds, waves, etc.) that have created the diverse landscapes of the United States. Attention is paid to the artist’s response to the landscape.

Science (SCI) 135: Volcanoes and Earthquakes (2 Credits)
A geologic study of two major catastrophic natural phenomena – volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, their impacts on society, and what they tell us about the Earth’s interior and the dynamic process of plate tectonics.

Science (SCI) 136: Fossils: A History of Life (2 Credits)
From trilobites to dinosaurs to wholly mammoths—this course follows the fossil evidece of the origins, evolutionary patterns and mass extinctions of life on Earth from its first appearance to the present day.

Science (SCI) 137: Birds and Birding (2 credits)
An introduction to the biology and identification of birds, including the origin of birds, their anatomy and physiology, their classification and evolution and their behavior as associated with feeding, reproduction, etc. Learning to identify birds, particularly during spring migration, will be an essential part of the course.

Science (SCI) 154: Stars and Galaxies (2 Credits)
A study of stars – their births, lives, and deaths; the groupings of stars into galaxies; and the origin and history of the universe.

Science (SCI) 155: The Solar System (2 Credits)
A study of the planets, moons, and other objects that make up our solar system. The internal structures, external features and surface conditions of these bodies, and an examination of their origins and histories will be considered.

Science (SCI) 210: Nutrition, Behavior and Culture (2 Credits)
A study of concepts of normal nutrition as they relate to all age groups, with specific reference to the needs of young adults and performers. The cultural and behavioral aspects of nutritional patterns will be considered, using community resources when available.

Science (SCI) 221, 222, 223: Human Anatomy and Physiology I, II, and III (2 Credits per Term)
A three-term sequence of study designed to provide a basic understanding of the structure and function of the human body, with an emphasis on aspects that support, produce, and control human movement. Anatomical study and occasional laboratory exercises are an integral part of the course.

SCI 221: Studies in Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Introduces the basic organization and structure, terminology, physiological concepts and begins study of major organ systems of the body.

SCI 222: Studies in Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Continues with focused study of organ systems responsible for movement. (Prerequisite: SCI 221)

SCI 223: Studies in Human Anatomy and Physiology III
continues study of major organ systems relevant to arts students. (Prerequisites: SCI 221 and SCI 222)

Science (SCI) 227: The Biology of Movement (3 Credits)
An opportunity for students to apply a knowledge of human anatomy and physiology to a more detailed study of the musculoskeletal system and its function in producing human movement. Injury and the prevention of injury will be considered; other activities are designed to help develop an accurate self-perception. Prerequisites: GES 101, 102, 103; SCI 221, 222 and 223 (SCI 223 may be a co-requisite with permission of instructor).

Science (SCI) 240: History of Science (2 Credits)
An exploration of the work of major scientists and the contributions of various ages and cultures to the development of scientific thought. Topics vary from year to year. Topics have previously included: Charles Darwin and Evolution, History of Astronomy, Scientific Explorations. Prerequisite: GES 101 or permission of instructor.

Science (SCI) 290: Contemporary Issues in Science (2 Credits)
A one-term course with flexible content, exploring each year a limited number of physical and biological topics/issues of current interest. Prerequisite: GES 101 or permission of instructor.