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 Courses - High School Program


English
Mathematics
Science
Foreign Languages
Health and Physical Education

Note: Not all courses offered every year.

English


Development of reading and writing skills, enjoyment and appreciation of literature, and development of taste and critical judgment are the general objectives that guide the design of the program.

ENG 001, 002, 003: Eighth-Grade English
A course with emphasis on development of grammatical knowledge and writing skills. Students study plays as well as short stories, narrative poetry, and novels.

ENG 011, 012, 013: English I: Composition and Literary Forms
A course concentrating on literature, grammar, and composition. Readings include short fiction, novels, drama, and poetry. Students learn research skills and the vocabulary of literary analysis.

ENG 021, 022, 023: English II: World Literature
A course concentrating on world literature, composition, and grammar. The emphasis is on the modes of discourse and a study of selected novels, plays and films.

ENG 027, 028, 029: ESL: Reading/Writing in World Literature
A one year high school English course in literature and writing for non-native speakers of English. The course concentrates on analyzing selections from world literature: prose, poetry, and drama. Emphasis is also on composition skills and the improvement of English vocabulary, syntax, and grammar.

ENG 031, 032, 033: English III: American Literature
A review of grammar, mechanics and vocabulary as a basis for advanced composition practice in a variety of modes. Along with regular readings and discussions of poetry and prose by American authors, the course introduces students to formal critical analysis of the literary genres.

ENG 034, 035, 036: English III: Advanced Placement English Language and Composition
A course which engages students in becoming skilled readers of American prose and poetry written in a variety of periods, disciplines and rhetorical contexts. Students work toward becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Students can qualify for college credit in many colleges upon satisfactory completion of the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in Language and Composition.

ENG 037, 038 039: Advanced Literature and Language Arts for Non-native Speakers of English
An upper-level literature and writing course in English for non-native speakers of English. The course builds on skills taught in ENG: 027, 028, 029 and covers in-depth discussion and written analysis of all literary genres, including fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry. Critical thinking and writing in English is paramount

ENG 041, 042, 043: English IV: Masterworks: Prose, Poetry, and Drama
A three-term course in which students read and discuss selected literary works from British, European and non-Western authors. Special attention is given to the refinement of skills in written and oral communication.

ENG 044, 045, 046: English IV: Themes in Literature
A three-term course in which students will experience a thematic approach to literature with a concentration on the major British works and authors. Focus will be on themes such as innocence and experience, conformity and rebellion, art and literature, and self and society. Emphasis will be placed on composition, and a variety of critical approaches will be used.

ENG 047, 048, 049: Literature and Film
This course will explore the intersection of film and literature. In the process, students will be introduced to the history and theory of film by studying some masterworks of cinema. The course will also study how literary texts are translated into film.

ENG 051, 052, 053: English V: Advanced Placement English Composition and Literature
A seminar-style course in which advanced students discuss readings from major writers. A wide variety of writing experiences, close readings of poetry and prose passages, and objective testing sessions characterize the weekly procedures. Students can qualify for college credit in many colleges upon satisfactory completion of The College Board Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition.

Mathematics

The mathematics program in the secondary school is designed to provide the opportunity for mastery of fundamental principles and basic techniques of mathematics and to offer advanced study in college preparatory courses. Placement testing is required prior to enrollment in any mathematics course.

MAT 014, 015, 016: Algebra I
A one-year, comprehensive algebra course for the accelerated student. Topics of study include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions. Students will use current technology in problem-solving and data analysis. Prerequisite: placement testing or Discovering Algebra

MAT 021, 022, 023: Geometry
A Euclidean geometry course which emphasizes the properties of parallel lines, triangles, polygons, and circles. These properties are applied in problem-solving and proof-writing. Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra IA and IB.

MAT 031, 032, 033: Algebra II
A second-year course which reinforces and extends the topics begun in Algebra I. The course includes the study of linear, exponential, quadratic, logarithmic and polynomial functions. Emphasis will be placed on the use of current technology. Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra IA and IB.

MAT 034, 035, 036: Algebra II Advanced
A second-year algebra course that reinforces and extends topics begun in Algebra I. The course includes a study of linear, exponential, quadratic, logarithmic, and polynomial functions. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications and modeling and on the use of current technology. This course is a preparation for Pre-Calculus. Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebra IA and IB.

Topics in Advanced Mathematics is a series of one-term courses that can be taken by the term or for one year.

MAT 041: Topics in Adv. Math: Quantitative Reasoning
A one-term course focusing on mathematical reasoning and advanced problem-solving. The course will include such topics as the principles of mathematical logic, statistical analysis, using and understanding numbers in context, and mathematical modeling. Prerequisite: Algebra II.

MAT 042: Topics in Advanced Mathematics: Financial and Scientific Applications
A one-term course exploring applications of mathematics in the contemporary world. This course will include such topics as financial management, exponential growth and decay, and probability and statistics. Prerequisite: Algebra II.

MAT 043: Topics in Advanced Mathematics: Mathematics and the Arts
A one-term course that explores the dynamic connections between advanced mathematics and music, dance, visual arts and literature. The course will examine the relationships between mathematical theory and such topics as the golden mean, Escher-like tessellations fractals. Prerequisite: Algebra II.

MAT 044, 045, 046: Pre-Calculus
An advanced mathematics course consisting of the study of functions and their applications. The course also includes an intense study of trigonometry. Emphasis is placed on the use of current technology in problem-solving and data analysis. Prerequisite: Algebra II.

MAT 047, 048, 049: Pre-Calculus
An advanced mathematics course consisting of the study of functions and their applications. The course also includes an intense study of trigonometry. Emphasis is placed on the use of current technology in problem-solving and data analysis. Prerequisite: Algebra II.

MAT 054, 055, 056: Advanced Placement Calculus AB
A course in single-variable calculus that includes techniques and applications of the derivative, techniques and applications of the definite integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Algebraic, graphical, numerical and narrative descriptions are emphasized throughout the course. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and the use of current technology. Students can qualify for college credit in many colleges upon satisfactory completion of the College Board Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam.

MAT 057, 058, 059: Statistics
This course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students will observe patterns and departures from patterns, decide what and how to measure, produce models using probability and simulation, and confirm models. Appropriate technology, from manipulatives to calculators and application software, will be used regularly for instruction and assessment.

Science

The science program in the secondary school is designed to introduce the student to the fundamental principles and basic techniques of science and to offer advanced study in specific subjects.

SCI 001, 002, 003: Eighth-Grade Science
A study of the basic topics, principles, and techniques of the physical and life sciences. Emphasis is on group cooperation and the development of the various skills necessary to gather, record, analyze, and summarize observations.

SCI 021, 022, 023: Biology
A study of the basic biological topics, principles and techniques through lecture, group work, class discussion and laboratory. Topics include, but are not limited to: nature, process and history of science; cell biology; molecular basis of heredity; biological evolution; interdependence of organisms; matter, energy, and organization in living systems; behavior of organisms. When appropriate, students also explore the cultural, social, and economic and political issues embedded in the biological sciences. This course is offered to students in grades 10 and above. Prerequisite: one unit of High School Environmental or Physical Science.

SCI 024, 025, 026: Physical Science
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of physics and chemistry and provides the foundation necessary to do well in later science courses. Students will learn and refine the following skills in the classroom and in the laboratory: observing; measuring; classifying, gathering, interpreting and displaying data; identifying and controlling variables; problem solving; and forming conclusions. This course is open to all students and satisfies the physical science graduation requirement. However, college-bound juniors and seniors might consider Chemistry or Physics.

SCI 031, 032, 033: Chemistry
A study of the general methods of science using chemistry as a vehicle. Students learn through lecture, discussion and laboratory work, with particular emphasis given to problem-solving techniques. Prerequisite: Algebra I and one unit of High School Biology.

SCI 034, 035, 036: Physics
A conceptual and mathematical approach to the study of matter and energy. Prerequisite: Algebra I and one unit of High School Biology.

SCI 037, 038, 039: Topics in the Biological Sciences
A course designed for juniors and seniors who wish to continue their study of biology or who wish to complete their diploma requirement in science with a focus in biology. Various topics are selected each school year for there discrete term courses. Possible topics may include North Carolina nature study, biology and culture, human senses, special topics in genetics, and special topics in environmental science. Assignments will include guided library research, careful reading, writing (analysis and reflection) and class discussion. Prerequisite: one unit of High School Biology.

SCI 041, 042, 043: Advanced Environmental Science
The curriculum focuses on the understanding that science is a process. Students will focus on how energy conversions underlie all ecological processes, how the earth itself is one interconnected system, how humans alter natural systems, how environmental problems have cultural and social context, and how humans must develop practices that will achieve sustainable systems. Prerequisite: One year of HS Biology.

SCI 044, 045, 046: Advanced Earth Science
A year-long, in-depth study for juniors and seniors of planet Earth—its materials and processes. The content includes geology, oceanography, meterology, and astronomy. Attention is paid to how humans interact with the terrestrial environment.

SCI 051, 052, 053: Advanced Biology
A year-long, in-depth study, for juniors and senior, of planet Earth – its materials and processes. The content includes geology oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. Attention is paid to how humans interact with the terrestrial environment. Prerequisite: One year of High School Biology or permission of the instructor.

Foreign Languages

The purpose of the high school French and Spanish programs is to achieve practical use of the language with emphasis on current speech patterns and writing style. The college French, German and Italian courses are open to high school juniors and seniors who meet placement testing requirements and the criteria for admission to a college course and whose schedules accommodate the course.

FRE 011, 012, 013: French I
Introduction to the basic sounds and speech patterns of French. Emphasis is on mastery of material studied, including the speaking, writing, reading, and aural-oral comprehension of the language in a culture-oriented atmosphere.

FRE 021, 022, 023: French II
Continued study of the language and the culture, including introduction of finer points of grammar, composition, and conversation. Further emphasis is on the four aspects of language learning introduced in French I. Prerequisite: French I; placement testing.

FRE 031, 032, 033: Advanced French
An in-depth study of the French language and culture, including advanced grammar structure, authentic French texts, music, videos, and films. The emphasis is on building vocabulary and conversational skills. The course is conducted in French. Prerequisite: French II; placement testing.

SPA 011, 012, 013: Spanish I
An introduction to the Spanish language, including speech patterns, grammar, writing, reading, and a diversity of cultural aspects related to Spanish.

SPA 021, 022 ,023: Spanish II
A comprehensive study of the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world, with emphasis on grammar, writing and conversation. The course is conducted primarily in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish I; placement testing.

SPA 031, 032, 033: Advanced Spanish
A course emphasizing meaning and communication, with the opportunity to improve fluency through writing, literary analysis, and the learning and understanding of the Spanish and Latin American culture. The course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish II; placement testing.

 

Social Sciences

The social studies program seeks to develop the student’s appreciation for history and the social sciences as a foundation for any cultural study. It follows the North Carolina Social Studies Curriculum in presenting a balanced and effective program with focus on Western and non-Western cultures, the American nation, as well as the social sciences. Elective courses may not be offered each year.

SST 004, 005, 006: Eighth-Grade Social Studies: NC History through the 21st Century
A study of NC history from the age of European discovery through contemporary times. Using U. S. History as a context, eighth grade students examine the roles of people, events and issues in North Carolina history.

SST 011, 012, 013: World History
An historical approach to the study of human experience throughout the world from ancient to contemporary times will be the core of this survey course. The contributions and patterns of living in civilizations around the world will be examined. This course is offered for students in grade 9.

SST 021, 022, 023: Civics and Economics
An introductory course which focuses on the development of economic, legal and political knowledge and skills needed by all students so that they may become responsible citizens in an interdependent world. This course is offered for students in grade 10.

SST 031, 032, 033: U.S. History
A study of U.S. history from the end of the 18th century, with special emphasis on the uniqueness of American institutions and their importance in the world today, as well as American artistic contributions. This course is offered for high school students in grades 11 and 12.

SST 034, 035, 036: World Cultures
A course designed to enable students to study the diversity and richness of the cultures of the world and to engage them in using the geography, history, arts, literature, and artifacts of those cultures as a means of understanding them. Cultural regions, institutions and practices chosen for examination may vary, but those used might include cultures of Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and the Commonwealth of Independent States.

SST 037, 038, 039: Advanced Civics and Economics
An advanced study of political science and economics, examining basic political, legal, and economic institutions and exploring issues facing today’s citizens. Students who have completed the tenth-grade course may take this advanced course for elective credit. This course is offered for eleventh and twelfth grade students.

SST 044, 045, 046: Topics in the Social Sceinces
An introduction to the social sciences (particularly psychology and sociology) as students study various topics that are selected for three distinctive term courses. The student receives one-third unit credit for each term completed, and a different topic is offered each term. Some examples of the kinds of offerings might include: the creative process, the psychology of imagination, and the artist in cultural context. Open to qualified 11th and 12th graders.

SST 051, 052, 053: Advanced Placement United States History
A challenging study of American history from the l6th century with special emphasis on the detailed analysis of political, socio-economic, artistic, and literary topics. Frequent research and writing assignments, readings of historical materials and scholarly interpretations, and objective testing are all regular components of the class. Students can qualify for college credit in many colleges upon the satisfactory completion of The College Board Advanced Placement Examination in United States History. Placement will be confirmed by the instructor.

SST 054, 055, 056: Advanced Placement European History
A course which will provide a basic narrative of events and movements in European history from the High Renaissance to the recent past. Themes will include intellectual and cultural history, political and diplomatic history, as well as social and economic history. Students can qualify for college credit in many colleges upon the satisfactory completion of The College Board Advanced Placement Examination in European History. Placement will be confirmed by the instructor.

Health and Physical Education

The goal of the health and physical education program is to instill in each student a lifelong commitment to individual wellness and fitness and to equip each student with the skills and knowledge to make informed decisions regarding his/her well-being. Age-appropriate health courses are offered; the physical education requirement for junior and senior high school students is met in the case of dance and drama students through their regularly scheduled arts courses. For music and visual arts students, a program is offered by the High School Academic Program.

HEA 011, 012, 013: Health
An introductory study of physical, mental, emotional and environmental health, including units in substance abuse prevention, human sexuality, interpersonal skills, disease control, and first-aid and emergency care.

PHE 001, 002, 003: Eighth-Grade Physical Education
An individually prescribed fitness course designed to meet the needs and interests of the eighth-grade student-artist and to complement the physical dimension of the arts training. Workouts are supervised by trained fitness personnel. Initial and follow-up evaluations are required to assess gains in fitness.

PHE 011, 012, 013: Physical Education
An individually prescribed fitness course designed to meet the needs and interests of the high school student-artist and to complement the physical dimension of the arts training. Workouts are supervised by trained fitness personnel. Initial and follow-up evaluations are required to assess gains in fitness.