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Nov. 4, 2011 / FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact: Marla Carpenter, 336-770-3337,
carpem@uncsa.edu

 

WINSTON-SALEM LIGHT PROJECT, PRESENTED BY UNCSA,
TO RETURN TO DOWNTOWN NOV. 15-19

“Energizing City Life” is Focus of 2011


WINSTON-SALEM – The 2011 Winston-Salem Light Project will focus on the “symphony of the city” and how residents contribute to the urban “soundscape.”

“This year’s project will focus on how the energy of the city affects us, and how we might energize the city,” said Project Founder and Director Norman Coates, who is director of the Lighting Program in the School of Design and Production at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts (UNCSA).

The Winston-Salem Light Project (WSLP) is a multimedia public art presentation designed by college seniors studying lighting design at UNCSA. It uses prominent downtown landmarks as the canvas. Non-senior students provide the technical crew for the project.

This year, the WSLP will be concentrated at the corner of Fourth and Marshall streets downtown, and will use UNCSA’s Stevens Center as its canvas. “We will paint the building with light,” Coates explained.

Coates’ students will use image and projection software to express their experiences of Winston-Salem’s urban landscape. For example, one section will reduce sounds to wave-form images, which will be projected onto the Stevens Center façade.

The Winston-Salem Light Project runs continuously from 7 to 11 p.m. Nov. 15-19. It is free and open to the public, and is a featured event of Six Days in November, the annual citywide arts and cultural festival.

Coates said the WSLP will provide viewers with an opportunity to visually explore the energy of the city. He said he considers the WSLP to be a “window” to the rest of the Six Days festival offerings, and will provide a “different” experience to those who regularly peruse art galleries. To those who do not, he said he hopes it will be “an introduction to the art all around us.”

Now in its fourth year, the Light Project utilizes technology and innovation to elevate awareness of the urban environment, while providing a unique visual experience. For more information about the Light Project, visit www.lightproject.org or www.uncsa.edu/performances/november.htm#Light.

Also in its fourth year, Six Days in November is sponsored by the Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County, and includes a host of arts, cultural and entertainment opportunities. This year’s festival, scheduled for the week before Thanksgiving, is tagged “A Feast for the Senses.” For more information about Six Days in November, visit: www.6DaysInNovember.com.

The University of North Carolina School of the Arts is the first state-supported, residential school of its kind in the nation. Established as the North Carolina School of the Arts by the N.C. General Assembly in 1963, UNCSA opened in Winston-Salem (“The City of Arts and Innovation”) in 1965 and became part of the University of North Carolina system in 1972. More than 1,100 students from high school through graduate school train for careers in the arts in five professional schools: Dance, Design and Production (including a Visual Arts Program), Drama, Filmmaking, and Music. UNCSA is the state’s only public arts conservatory, dedicated entirely to the professional training of talented students in the performing, visual and moving image arts. For more information, visit www.uncsa.edu.

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