Course Descriptions - UNCSA

Course Descriptions

Summer College Online

Course Descriptions

Once you've been accepted, you may register for the summer courses listed below via E-Z Arts. If you need help logging into the student portal E-Z Arts, see E-Z Arts login instructions. 

ENG 1102: English Composition II

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60003 ENG 1102 English Composition II (3 Credits) G. Clements

Description:
The fundamental components of a liberal arts education include the ability to think clearly, read closely, write persuasively, speak articulately and listen openly. The composition sequence will emphasize the development of these skills as students engage with a variety of works, including UNCSA productions. Course materials are designed to shed light on ways that artists perceive issues in art, their relationships with their communities, and how their works reflect shifting and evolving social concerns. Although the content may vary, depending on the year’s production schedule, assignments will include both the analysis and generation of text-media (such as essays, literature, proposals and cover letters, liner notes, blogs), speech-media (presentations, interviews, radio drama, podcasts) image- media (diagrams, sketches, drawings, assemblages), mixed-media (multimedia pieces, digital stories, websites, online studio, videos), and collaborative-media (productions, plays, performances).

Prerequisite(s): Passing ENG 1101 required for admission to ENG 1102.

HUM 2101: Self, Society & Cosmos

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60008 HUM 2101 Self, Society & Cosmos (3 Credits) M. Wakeford

Description:
An in-depth examination of some of the fundamental texts that contribute to the conversation about the essentials of the human condition. Readings will include, but not be limited to, Plato’s Republic, selections from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, at least one important example of non-Western thought, and a challenging contemporary work, and can be drawn from a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, literature, the social sciences, the natural sciences, and the arts.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 1102 or equivalent.

HUM 2107: P2P: History of Psychology

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60016 HUM 2107 Paths to the Present: History of Psychology (3 Credits) J. Gredlein

Description:
Discussion of prescientific thinking on psychological problems, origin of systems of psychology, and ways systems are reflected in contemporary psychology. Beginning with ancient Greek science, the course will cover the scientific revolution, and Newtonian Psychologists. This would lead to the rise of physiology and the birth of psychology. The course will include the biological psychology of Wundt, Psychoanalysis and Freud, Behaviorism, Humanistic psychology, culminating with the cognitive revolution and the push toward a sociocultural perspective. The course will move from the philosophical beginnings of psychology to the modern day version that is largely tied to the medical model of disease and disorder. Further, the Darwinian influence on present day psychology is large, and will be discussed at length.

Prerequisite(s): HUM 2101. 

The online version of this course is currently available only during Summer School sessions, maximum 15 students.

LIT 2102: American Literature II

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60019 LIT 2102 American Literature II (3 Credits) G. Clements

Description:
This course studies literature written in the United States of America from the mid-nineteenth century to recent times. Works are chosen to represent diverse ethnic, racial, and social groups in historical, political, and economic contexts for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character. Representative works include Realist and Naturalist literature, immigrant and Native American experience, classic works from the WWI and WWII eras, and feminist expression, among others.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 1102 or equivalent.

LIT 2998: Topics in Dramatic Lit: Exploring "The Actress"

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60013 LIT 2998 Topics in Dramatic Literature: Exploring "The Actress" (3 Credits) G. Clements

Description:
Explore the significance and influence of women and the actress (on stage and screen) from eighteenth century to present day. Highlighted topics: actress's self-image and perception of her art; relationship between her public profession and private life; how she reflects/sets contemporary standards for beauty and lifestyle; how she provokes public debate over women's "appropriate" sexual, familial, professional, and public roles; her function as symbol/role model (from Jane Fonda to Susan Sarandon and many others) for her gender, race, nation. Includes Chekhov's The Seagull, Tennessee Williams’ adaptation The Notebook of Trigorin, Ibsen’s A Doll House, and All About Eve, various scholarly articles and modern representations to be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 1102 or equivalent.

MST 2500: Impact of New Media

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60020 MST 2500 Impact of New Media (3 Credits) B. King

Description:
Is new media making us stupid? Less creative? Socially inept? Insensitive? Unable to pay attention? Narrow-minded? Or the opposite of all — or some — of the above? Take this class if you want to talk about, research, read about, and take part in in class debates on issues swirling around new media in the contemporary moment.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 1102 or equivalent.

PSY 1100: General Psychology

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60005 PSY 1100 General Psychology (3 Credits) J. Gredlein

Description:
This is a broad survey of psychology. Topics to be addressed include psychology as science, nervous system, growth and development, sensory and perceptual processes, motivation, emotion, learning, social behavior, personality (normal and pathological), statistics, testing, intelligence, aptitudes, and achievement. The online version of this course is currently available only during Summer School sessions.

SCI 1110: Nutrition and Personal Health

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60011 SCI 1110 Nutrition and Personal Health (3 Credits) J. Loggins

Description:
A study of the normal nutritional requirements of the human body, the relationship of diet to health, and the impact of behavior and cultural influences on food choices. Students will analyze their own diet relative to recommended standards for young adults. Whenever available, community resources will be utilized for content enrichment. The online version of this course is currently available only during Summer School sessions.