Course Descriptions

Summer College Online

Course Descriptions

Once you've been accepted, you may register for the summer courses listed below via E-Z Arts. If you need help logging into the student portal E-Z Arts, see E-Z Arts login instructions.

Registration for Summer 2018 courses ends May 11, 2018.

ENG 1102: English Composition II

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60003 ENG 1102 English Composition II (3 Credits) G. Clements

Description:
The fundamental components of a liberal arts education include the ability to think clearly, read closely, write persuasively, speak articulately and listen openly. The composition sequence will emphasize the development of these skills as students engage with a variety of works, including UNCSA productions. Course materials are designed to shed light on ways that artists perceive issues in art, their relationships with their communities, and how their works reflect shifting and evolving social concerns. Although the content may vary, depending on the year’s production schedule, assignments will include both the analysis and generation of text-media (such as essays, literature, proposals and cover letters, liner notes, blogs), speech-media (presentations, interviews, radio drama, podcasts) image- media (diagrams, sketches, drawings, assemblages), mixed-media (multimedia pieces, digital stories, websites, online studio, videos), and collaborative-media (productions, plays, performances).

Prerequisite(s): Passing ENG 1101 required for admission to ENG 1102.

HUM 2101: Self, Society & Cosmos

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60008 HUM 2101 Self, Society & Cosmos (3 Credits) M. Wakeford

Description:
An in-depth examination of some of the fundamental texts that contribute to the conversation about the essentials of the human condition. Readings will include, but not be limited to, Plato’s Republic, selections from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, at least one important example of non-Western thought, and a challenging contemporary work, and can be drawn from a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, literature, the social sciences, the natural sciences, and the arts.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 1102, ENG 1200 or equivalent.

HUM 2108: P2P: American Ideas

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60027 HUM 2108 Paths to the Present: American Ideas (3 Credits) M. Wakeford

Description:
This course will examine the key intellectual currents in American thought from the post-Civil War era of Reconstruction into contemporary times. Students will explore developments in the areas of philosophy, science, political and social criticism, the arts and culture, and in conceptions of race, gender, and sexuality in order to better understand how American thinkers have made sense of and commented upon the modern condition. Special attention will be given to how developments in these areas have both drawn upon and found expression in the work of major American artists during the past century, as well as in the work of a variety of contemporary intellectuals who are writing and blogging today. 

Prerequisite(s): HUM 2101.

LIT 2102: American Literature II

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60019 LIT 2102 American Literature II (3 Credits) G. Clements

Description:
This course studies literature written in the United States of America from the mid-nineteenth century to recent times. Works are chosen to represent diverse ethnic, racial, and social groups in historical, political, and economic contexts for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character. Representative works include Realist and Naturalist literature, immigrant and Native American experience, classic works from the WWI and WWII eras, and feminist expression, among others.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 1102, ENG 1200 or equivalent.

LIT 2298-01:  Topics:  Magical Realism

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60036 LIT 2298 Magical Realism (3 Credits) S. Matsumoto

Description:
In this course, we’ll take a close look at texts that fall into a genre called “magical realism.” These texts incorporate fantastical or supernatural elements into narratives rendered using the tenets of literary realism—tenets that include centralization of character interiority, portrayal of the mundane, and a tendency to account for the social and structural forces that affect human lives. In magical realist texts, the extraordinary is made ordinary, often as a means of bringing into relief some social reality or human truth. These texts will bring into question our own rationalistic modes of understanding reality and contrast them with the ideologies and belief systems of other cultures.

Our texts will include one novel and several short stories, as well as works of visual art, including paintings and film. We will also make use of critical and theoretical readings that will help us understand how our texts function aesthetically, and will also shed light on the historical and sociopolitical forces to which the texts respond. Though magical realism is often associated with the Latin American Literary Boom, we will read texts by authors from around the world, including North and South America, Japan, Russia, and Continental Europe. 

Prerequisite(s):  ENG 1102, ENG 1200 or equivalent.

LIT 2995: Acts of Betrayal in Contemporary Theatre

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60035 LIT 2995 Acts of Betrayal in Contemporary Theatre (3 Credits) M. MacLeod

Description:
This class will explore contemporary plays by Edward Albee, Neil Labute, Suzan Lori-Parks, and Paula Vogel that wrestle with morals and expectations. Are these prescribed boundaries and, if so, who sets them and what complexities of identity arise when these boundaries are violated? Discussions will also involve structure, character development, and how these plays parallel and deviate from the drama form of tragedy. Is there perhaps a vein of postmodern tragedy of unanswerable questions developing in contemporary theater?

Prerequisite(s): ENG 1102, ENG 1200 or equivalent.

LIT 2998-01: Topics in Dramatic Lit: Italian Drama

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60024 LIT 2998-01 Topics in Dramatic Literature: Italian Drama (3 Credits) M. Ronzani

Description:
Italian theaters and dramatic literature of the late 19th and early 20th century were fresh, innovative and very influential for international dramatic developments. This course will present Italian dramatic texts (in translation) in their historical and cultural contexts, and address their novelty and their relationship with Italian dramatic and operatic traditions. Readings will include plays by Giovanni Verga, Luigi Pirandello, the Futurists, Eduardo De Filippo and others, with a particular focus on Nobel Prize winner Pirandello. Students will engage in close readings of the texts and in analyses of their critical reception in order to develop textual analytical skill, examine the impact of Italian drama on modern western theater, reflect on the relationship between innovation and tradition and learn about Italian culture.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 1102, ENG 1200 or equivalent.

PHI 1100: Introduction to Philosophy

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60025 PHI 1100 Introduction to Philosophy (3 Credits) R. Holland

Description:
An exploration of philosophical inquiry concerning such topics as the nature of knowledge, the mind, free will, God, value, liberty, and the meaning of life. Technical requirements for online sections: functional Internet connection and web browsing software; Microsoft Word, Apple Pages, or equivalent word processing software.

PSY 1100: General Psychology

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60005 PSY 1100 General Psychology (3 Credits) J. Gredlein

Description:
This is a broad survey of psychology. Topics to be addressed include psychology as science, nervous system, growth and development, sensory and perceptual processes, motivation, emotion, learning, social behavior, personality (normal and pathological), statistics, testing, intelligence, aptitudes, and achievement. The online version of this course is currently available only during Summer School sessions.

SCI 1110: Nutrition and Personal Health

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor
60011 SCI 1110 Nutrition and Personal Health (3 Credits) J. Loggins

Description:
A study of the normal nutritional requirements of the human body, the relationship of diet to health, and the impact of behavior and cultural influences on food choices. Students will analyze their own diet relative to recommended standards for young adults. Whenever available, community resources will be utilized for content enrichment. The online version of this course is currently available only during Summer School sessions.