Course Descriptions

Summer College Online

Course Descriptions

Once you've been accepted, you may register for the summer courses listed below via E-Z Arts. If you need help logging into the student portal E-Z Arts, see E-Z Arts login instructions.

Registration for Summer 2024 courses ends May 28, 2024. 

Courses Descriptions

ARM 2050-01:
Personal Finance for the Artist

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor(s)
TBA ARM 2050-01
(3 Credits)
Personal Finance for the Artist Katie Wolf

Description: 
This course will help prepare students that are entering the workforce to better understand the importance of sound personal financial management. Topics to be covered include an introduction to basic business and economic principles, fundamentals of investing (including risk vs. return)., personal budgeting, preparation of an artist's personal income tax return, understanding employee benefits, insurance basics, independent contractor status, and retirement planning. This course is geared toward all student artists; therefore no prior background in business is required.
Pre-requisite(s): ENG 1200

HUM 2100-01:
Critical Dialogues

CRN# Course Cours Name Instructor(s)
TBA HUM 2100-01
(3 Credits)
Critical Dialogues 

Andrew Britt

Description:
In this core humanities course, students encounter exemplary texts from antiquity to the present and from multiple continents and diverse cultures. How do we make meaning from this expansive record of storytelling, inquiry, and creative expression? How can today's artist-citizens respond as active conversation partners across time and space? Specific content and thematic emphases will vary across course sections, reflecting the diverse specializations and perspectives of Division of Liberal Arts faculty. In all sections, however, students will wrestle both with texts long privileged as 'canonical' and, of equal importance, others that speak from the margins and compel us to think critically about how we assign value and importance to different voices and traditions. All sections also share one significant contemporary text (selected annually). “Critical Dialogues” students will cultivate their skills of research, writing, and verbal expression, and in doing so, situate their artistic and professional practice in specific contexts and as woven into a larger world of ideas. Prerequisite: ENG 1200 or equivalent

HUM 2112-02:
Paths to the Present:
Imagining the Apocalypse 

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor(s)
60076 HUM 2112-02
(3 Credits)
Paths to the Present:
Imagining the Apocalypse 
Bethany Kibler

Description:
This interdisciplinary course will consider apocalyptic traditions from the Revelation of John through to the climate catastrophe films of today. We will ask 1) what stories about the end of the world can reveal about the peoples that tell them, 2) what kinds of social, political, and personal work such stories do in both the telling and retelling, and 3) what might be gained (or lost) by applying the 'apocalyptic' frame to works and events not normally included in the genre. Across the term, we will foreground examples of apocalypses in visual arts, music, literature, film, television, and other cultural fields. Students will have ample opportunity for individual research as well as for creative reckoning with an apocalypse of their choice.  Prerequisite: HUM 2101

LIT 2298-01:
Topics in Literature:  Poetry

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor(s)
TBA LIT 2298-01
(3 Credits)
Topics in Literature:  Poetry Joe Mills

Description:
The study of a variety of texts from American, British and other literatures written in English. Each course focuses on the work of a writer, group of writers, region, period, style, genre or theme. The online version of this course is currently available only during Summer School sessions. Prerequisite(s):ENG 1200

MAT 1500-01:
Applied Mathematics

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor(s)
60078 MAT 1500-01
(3 Credits)
Applied Mathematics Joshua Recore

Description:
This course covers the real number system, basic properties of real numbers, and operations with fractional expressions, powers, roots and radicals. It also covers applications of mathematics from algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Geometrical ideas and notions presented in this course are used to reinforce or enrich algebraic concepts, providing the background for trigonometry (study of angles), which is especially useful for applied mathematics.

PHI 1100-01:
Introduction to Philosophy

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor(s)
60077 PHI 1100-01
(3 Credits)
Introduction to Philosophy  Rich Holland

Description:
An exploration of philosophical inquiry concerning such topics as the nature of knowledge, the mind, free will, God, value, liberty, and the meaning of life. Technical requirements for online sections: Functional internet connection and Web browsing software; Microsoft Word, Apple Pages, or equivalent word processing software.

PSY 1100-01: General Psychology

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor(s)
TBA PSY 1100-01
(3 Credits)
General Psychology Jeff Gredlein

This is a broad survey of psychology. Topics to be addressed include psychology as science, nervous system, growth and development, sensory and perceptual processes, motivation, emotion, learning, social behavior, personality (normal and pathological), statistics, testing, intelligence, aptitudes, and achievement. 

SOC 1100-01: Introduction to Sociology

CRN# Course Course Name Instructor(s)
60079 SOC 1100
(3 Credits)
Introduction to Sociology  Amy Ernstes

Description:
This is a broad survey and introduction to the social sciences discipline of sociology. This course will provide students with an overview of the scientific method in the social sciences, the sociological perspective, sociological theory, and problems and issues in society. Students will engage in critical readings and discussion around topics including social structures, social stratification, and the role of race, ethnicity, and gender in society. Students will learn to apply the sociological perspective and scientific method towards the analysis of social issues, distinguishing between values, opinions, and facts.